• Drug duo may rapidly shrink breast tumors in some patients

    A two-drug combo quickly shrinks certain breast cancer tumors before surgery or chemotherapy in some women, British researchers report.

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  • Beta blockers may lead to new novel triple negative breast cancer treatments

    New research published in the March 2016 issue of The FASEB Journal, shows that a commonly prescribed class of high blood pressure drugs may have the potential to slow the growth of triple negative breast cancer tumors.

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  • Single dose of trastuzumab kick starts immune response in certain breast cancers

    A tumor's immune response to a single dose of the HER2 inhibitor trastuzumab predicted which patients with HER2-positive breast cancer would respond to the drug on a more long-term basis, according to the results of a study published recently in Clinical Cancer Research.

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  • Breast reconstruction using abdominal tissue — Differences in outcome with four different techniques

    In women undergoing breast reconstruction using their own (autologous) tissue, newer "muscle-sparing" abdominal flaps can reduce complications while improving some aspects of quality of life, reports a study in the March issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

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  • Ovarian cancer expert says risk from talcum powder ‘very low’

    A decision by a jury in the U.S. to award $72 million to the family of a woman who died of ovarian cancer after years of using talcum powder is raising questions about the safety of the powder. But at least one expert in ovarian cancer says the actual risks of talcum powder are very low.

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  • Exercise for weight loss may lower inflammation, breast cancer risk

    For postmenopausal women who are overweight, it makes sense that losing weight could reduce their risk of breast cancer because being overweight or obese increases the risk. Now a new study suggests that for overweight women working to lose weight, weight loss fueled primarily by exercise -- along with cutting calories -- may add extra benefit in lowering the risk of this cancer.

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  • Topical Estrogen May Help With Side Effects After Breast Cancer

    American gynecologists say that breast cancer survivors should have the option of using topical estrogen to relieve symptoms such as painful sex and urinary tract infections.

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  • Biomarkers to Guide Treatment for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    To help doctors provide their patients with the highest quality care, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) developed a new guideline on how to use biomarkers to guide the treatment of early-stage breast cancer. This guide for patients is based on ASCO’s most recent recommendations.

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  • Fat injection for breast reconstruction doesn’t increase risk of recurrent breast cancer

    Results from a controlled study shows that, used as part of breast reconstruction, lipofilling is a safe procedure that does not increase the risk of recurrent or new breast cancers.

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  • Higher dietary fiber intake in young women may reduce breast cancer risk

    Women who eat more high-fiber foods during adolescence and young adulthood—especially lots of fruits and vegetables—may have significantly lower breast cancer risk than those who eat less dietary fiber when young, according to a new large-scale study led by researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

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  • Women fear genetic test for breast cancer could drive up insurance costs

    Companies can demand to see results of genetic tests before insuring Canadian clients

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  • For breast cancer patients, never too late to quit smoking

    New study clarifies long-term health consequences of smoking in breast cancer survivors.

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  • Immune system takes long time to recover after breast cancer chemo

    New research that looks at the long-term effects of chemotherapy on breast cancer survivors finds it weakens parts of the immune system for at least 9 months after treatment.

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  • Breast cancer survivors could be vulnerable to common illnesses

    Breast cancer survivors treated with chemotherapy could be vulnerable to common illnesses because of the long-term impact on the body’s immune response, according to new research findings.

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  • Following AICR recommendations lowers breast cancer risk

    Regardless of family history of breast cancer or other set risk factors, women who follow more of AICR's Recommendations for Cancer Prevention have a lower risk of breast cancer compared to women who follow the fewest, suggests a new study. Staying a healthy body weight and drinking no more than one alcoholic drink a day are the two recommendations that independently linked to decreased risk independently.

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  • Study reveals potential therapy targets for triple-negative breast cancer

    A multi-institutional international study led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has revealed new information about how molecules called long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) interact with HIF-1, a signaling pathway that is overexpressed in many cancers. HIF-1 has been shown to regulate breast cancer progression.

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  • Study links high sugar intake to increased risk of breast cancer

    When it comes to the rising rates of obesity, sugar is deemed a key culprit. But high sugar intake may not only lead to weight gain; a new study claims it can increase the risk of breast cancer and hasten spread of the disease to the lungs.

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  • Study finds gaps in patient knowledge of breast reconstruction surgery and complications

    Researchers at UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center found that breast cancer patients surveyed about their knowledge of breast reconstruction were only moderately informed about the procedure, and their knowledge of complications was low. The study, published in the journal Annals of Surgery, surveyed 126 breast cancer patients planning to undergo mastectomy at the N.C. Cancer Hospital.

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  • Eat your veggies to cut breast-cancer risk

    A vegetable-packed diet has been linked to a lower risk of high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, cataract, macular degeneration and cognitive decline. Now, a study published online last month in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggests the benefits of eating more vegetables extend to breast-cancer prevention.

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  • Who can delay breast cancer treatment? A new math model adds clues

    A new study adds to a growing conversation on the best way to treat women with stage 0 breast cancer.

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  • Breast cancer gene BRCA1 may be involved in Alzheimer’s disease

    The BRCA1 gene is well known for the link between its mutated forms and higher risk for breast and ovarian cancers. Now, a new study finds that low levels of BRCA1 protein in the brain may be a factor in Alzheimer's disease.

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  • Drug may help breast cancer patients avoid heart damage

    Study suggests cardiac problems may be helped by giving heart drug during cancer treatment.

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  • Exercise could give margin of safety to women who want to delay preventive mastectomy

    Exercise reduces estrogen-sensitive breast tissue in women at high risk of breast cancer.

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  • Provinces vary widely on coverage of breast cancer treatments

    A new report from the Canadian Breast Cancer Network (CBCN) found that provinces are approving the same breast cancer therapies at widely different rates.

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  • Genetic test identifies which breast cancer patients can avoid chemotherapy

    A new study published in The New England Journal of Medicine reveals how a genetic test was successful in predicting which patients with early-stage breast cancer are unlikely to benefit from chemotherapy.

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  • Extra virgin olive oil may help lower risk of breast cancer in older women

    A study looking into the the effect of the Mediterranean diet on preventing cardiovascular disease yielded an unexpected result — the Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra virgin olive oil lowered the risk of breast cancer in older women by 68 percent.

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  • Leukemia virus in cattle may raise risk for human breast cancer

    odds of a woman developing breast cancer is significantly higher if bovine leukemia virus is present, a new study suggests. These odds, researchers say, are far higher than with other common risk factors associated with breast cancer, such as obesity, alcohol consumption or the use of postmenopausal hormones.

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  • Double mastectomy is on the rise in men with breast cancer — and it’s worrying some doctors

    Researchers report that the number of male breast cancer patients getting what's called contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (or CPM), which involves removing a healthy breast in addition to the one with a tumor, nearly doubled from 2004 to 2011.

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  • Blood test could predict breast cancer’s return: study

    An experimental blood test may be able to predict whether a woman with breast cancer will suffer a relapse months before new tumours would be detectable on scans.

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  • ‘Stage 0’ breast cancer surgically overtreated in U.S.

    Findings suggest DCIS is cancer though a curable form in most cases.

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  • Testing for more breast cancer genes offers useful information

    When the results of a test wouldn’t change how doctors manage a patient’s care, most say it’s not worth doing. But new tests for breast cancer risk mutations beyond the well-known BRCA genes would offer actionable information for many women and their doctors, a new study finds.

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  • Two generic drugs shown to reduce breast cancer deaths

    There's new evidence that two inexpensive generic drugs, aromatase inhibitors and bisphosphonates, can improve survival rates for women who develop breast cancer after menopause.

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  • Lymph node radiation may halt breast cancer recurrences

    Two new studies show promising results for the use of radiation therapy to prevent breast cancer from coming back.

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  • Why are breast cancer survivors prone to weight gain?

    Women who survive breast cancer are more likely to gain weight over the following years than women who have not had cancer - especially if they have a family history of the disease - according to a new study. Women treated with chemotherapy are at particular risk for weight gain, claim researchers from Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center in Baltimore, MD.

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  • Needless breast cancer imaging common in Ontario, study finds

    Most women with early-stage breast cancer had unnecessary imaging done after diagnosis, despite guidelines recommending against it, according to a large Ontario study raising questions about why this occurred.

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  • New legislation introduced to protect Canadians from discrimination based on genetic test results and information

    Today, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada Peter MacKay, announced the introduction of legislation aimed at better protecting Canadians and their personal information, by preventing the misuse of genetic information in Canada. This legislation proposes amendments to three federal laws, namely, the Canadian Human Rights Act, the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act, and the Privacy Act, to provide greater legal clarity on the protection offered by these laws with respect to genetic test results.

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  • Mammography still best for breast cancer screening, experts find

    An international group of independent breast cancer experts have met to evaluate the benefits of different methods of screening for breast cancer, arriving at the conclusion that mammography is best for reducing breast cancer mortality in women aged over 50.

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  • Screening cuts risk of breast cancer death almost in half

    Women who undergo mammography screening reduce their risk of dying from breast cancer by 40 per cent, an international study published in the United States showed.

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  • Cancer cases projected to rise 40% in 15 years as population ages, grows

    New cancer cases are expected to increase by about 40 per cent by 2030 as the population ages and grows, the Canadian Cancer Society says.

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  • Family history has ‘no adverse effect’ on breast cancer outcomes

    Young women with breast cancer in their family background who need treatment for the disease themselves need not worry that it will be any less successful for them as for women without a family history, suggests a study comparing sporadic versus hereditary breast cancer.

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  • Breast cancer patients 60+ with luminal A subtype may not need radiation if on hormone therapy

    Women with luminal A subtype breast cancer - and particularly those older than 60 - may not need radiation treatment if they are already taking hormone therapy, shows clinical research led by radiation oncologists at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre published online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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  • Researchers discover new gene strongly linked to breast cancer

    In a new study published in Nature Genetics, researchers have uncovered mutations in a gene that they say are strongly linked to the development of breast cancer.

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  • Ovary removal may improve breast cancer survival with gene mutation

    Women with a gene mutation that puts them at a high risk of breast and ovarian cancers have better survival odds if their ovaries and fallopian tubes are removed soon after a breast cancer diagnosis, suggests a new study from Canada.

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  • Coffee could make breast cancer drug tamoxifen more effective

    "A cancer-killing cocktail of the hormone drug tamoxifen and two coffees every day was found to reduce the risk of [breast cancer] tumours returning," the Mail Online reports. The same study also found evidence that caffeine slowed the cancer's growth.

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  • BRCA gene datashare will help detect cancer risk

    A first-of-its-kind genetic datashare program is being launched to zero in on patients with unclear BRCA test results — and save more women from the devastation of breast and ovarian cancer.

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  • Eisai congratulates breast cancer community for offering important new retreat programs

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  • Study shows risk of breast and ovarian cancer may differ by type of BRCA1, BRCA2 mutation

    In a study involving more than 31,000 women with cancer-causing mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes, researchers identified mutations that are associated with significantly different risks of breast and ovarian cancers

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  • Angelina Jolie Pitt: Diary of a Surgery

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  • Breast biopsies leave room for doubt, study finds

    Breast biopsies are good at telling the difference between healthy tissue and cancer, but less reliable for identifying more subtle abnormalities, a new study finds.

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  • Study confirms genetic link between prostate and breast cancer

    Women with close male relatives with prostate cancer are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer, a new U.S. study confirms.

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  • Filipino newcomers to Canada diagnosed with breast cancer at a younger age

    Filipinos who move to Canada are diagnosed with breast cancer at a younger age than women from other parts of East Asia or Caucasians, new research has found.

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  • Exercise hormone may factor in breast cancer prevention

    University of New Mexico researchers are studying a newly discovered hormone that releases from muscle after exercise. Irisin, named for the Greek “messenger” goddess Iris, may prevent breast cancer and boost the effects of chemotherapy drugs used in breast cancer treatment.

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  • Drug/chemotherapy combination lengthens survival for patients with aggressive form of breast cancer

    Treatment combining chemotherapy with two drugs lengthens survival of patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer by an average of nearly 16 months, according to a new study.

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  • FDA approves Ibrance for patients with estrogen-receptor positive advanced breast cancer

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a potentially groundbreaking new drug to treat women with advanced breast cancer, signaling a new treatment strategy to arrest tumor growth and extend the time before the cancer worsens.

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  • Many breast cancer patients have poor knowledge about their condition

    A new study published in the journal Cancer reveals that many women with breast cancer in the US do not know much about their condition, with minority women being less likely to report accurate information about their tumors than white women.

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  • New breast exam nearly quadruples detection of invasive breast cancers in women with dense breast tissue

    A new breast imaging technique pioneered at Mayo Clinic nearly quadruples detection rates of invasive breast cancers in women with dense breast tissue, according to the results of a major study published in the American Journal of Roentgenology.

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  • Race may influence a woman’s breast cancer outcome, study finds

    Race may influence whether women diagnosed with breast cancer will survive, suggests a new study which found black women are more likely to die even when their tumours are found when they are small and theoretically easier to treat.

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  • Scientists identify new gene that drives triple-negative breast cancer

    In a new study, researchers from the UK have discovered a novel gene that, when mutated, can drive development and progression of triple-negative breast cancer -- an aggressive form of the disease that accounts for 10-20% of breast cancers.

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  • Study shows women with stage 1 HER2-positive breast cancers could benefit from Herceptin

    Results of a phase 2 study showed that women with small, stage 1 HER2-positive breast cancer who received a combination of lower-intensity chemotherapy and Herceptin following surgery were highly unlikely to have a recurrence.

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  • Hold your breath to protect your heart

    A simple technique may be most effective in preventing heart disease after radiation therapy for breast cancer. New research shows a woman who holds her breath during radiation pulses can greatly reduce radiation exposure to the heart.

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  • Herceptin for HER2-positive breast cancer improves long-term survival

    A study that analyzed the long-term safety and effectiveness of trastuzumab - more commonly known as Herceptin - found it significantly improves long-term survival of patients with HER-2 positive breast cancer when combined with chemotherapy.

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  • Low-fat diet may boost survival for some breast cancer patients

    Eating a low-fat diet may reduce the risk of early death in some women with breast cancer, according to new research.

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  • Researchers validate recurrence risk test for DCIS

    Researchers have validated a multi-gene biomarker panel shown to predict the risk of recurrence among patients diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) who had breast-conserving surgery treatment alone.

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  • Adding ovarian suppression to tamoxifen reduced recurrence for some women with premenopausal breast cancer

    Among premenopausal women with early-stage, hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, adding ovarian suppression to tamoxifen reduced breast cancer recurrence for those who had previously received chemotherapy and remained premenopausal, according to data from the randomized, phase III suppression of ovarian function trial (SOFT).

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  • New evidence reveals tamoxifen reduces breast cancer rates by nearly a third for 20 years

    The preventive effect of breast cancer drug 'tamoxifen' remains virtually constant for at least 20 years – with rates reduced by around 30 per cent – new analysis published in The Lancet Oncology reveals.

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  • Early trial of new drug shows promise for patients with triple-negative breast cancer

    In patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer—a disease with no approved targeted therapies—infusion of pembrolizumab produced durable responses in almost one out of five patients enrolled in a phase-Ib clinical trial, according to data presented Dec. 10, at the 2014 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

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  • Breast cancer recurrence risk down since 1980s

    Rates of breast cancer recurrence fell by half or more between the 1980s and the early 2000s - likely due to improved treatments and increased screenings, according to a new Canadian study.

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  • With gene mutations, second breast cancer risk rises over time

    Women who are genetically susceptible to breast cancer and develop it in one breast are at higher than average risk for a tumor in the other breast, and that risk may increase as time goes on, according to a new analysis.

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  • Telephone support intervention beneficial for BRCA carriers

    A telephone-based, peer-support program can reduce distress and unmet information needs among women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, according to a new study.

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  • Impact of meditation, support groups seen at cellular level in breast cancer survivors

    For the first time, researchers have shown that practising mindfulness meditation or being involved in a support group has a positive physical impact at the cellular level in breast cancer survivors.

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  • Report card on complementary therapies for breast cancer

    In newly published guidelines from the Society for Integrative Oncology, researchers analyzed which integrative treatments appear to be most effective and safe for patients.

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  • Dating after breast cancer can be a delicate balance

    Women who’ve had breast cancer often feel discouraged and vulnerable in the dating world, but researchers say there is good news: it is possible to develop successful intimate relationships.

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  • Osteoporosis treatment may also benefit breast cancer patients

    Study shows treatment with a bisphosphonate (a common osteoporosis medication) has protective effect on bone metastasis

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  • A high-soy diet may drive breast tumor growth : study

    For some women with breast cancer, taking soy protein supplements boosted the expression of tumor genes associated with an increase in tumor cells, in a recent randomized trial.

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  • Do bras cause breast cancer? Researchers say, no

    New study puts to rest whether wearing a bra can cause cancer.

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  • Double mastectomies on the rise, but surgery doesn’t boost breast cancer survival rate

    The number of women choosing to undergo a double mastectomy after a breast cancer diagnosis is on the rise, new research reveals. But a second study also finds that women who choose to have both breasts removed survive about as long as patients who choose less-invasive lumpectomy surgery instead.

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  • Overactive protein in basal-like carcinoma offers target for new breast cancer therapeutics

    Scientists have identified a biomarker, a protein called STAT3, strongly associated with basal-like breast cancer, a highly aggressive carcinoma that is resistant to many types of chemotherapy.

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  • Aspirin ‘halves breast cancer recurrence in overweight women’

    New research from the University of Texas in Austin finds that recurrence of hormone-related breast cancer in overweight and obese women can be reduced by half with the regular use of aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

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  • Cancer linked to menopause drug in new report

    Popular menopause drugs made in part from estrogen found in the urine of pregnant horses have caused breast cancer in thousands of Canadian women, according to allegations in a new report by the Canadian Cancer Society’s top epidemiologist.

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  • Study shows third gene as indicator for breast cancer

    Researchers report that mutations in a gene called PALB2 raise the risk of breast cancer in women by almost as much as mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2.

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  • Breast cancer drug’s effectiveness improved by sleeping in dark

    Study finds link between tamoxifen resistant tumours and melatonin levels

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  • Acupuncture for breast cancer patients on aromatase inhibitors improved anxiety and depression

    A study focused on breast cancer patients coping with joint pain and quality-of-life issues like fatigue and anxiety has found that acupuncture can provide some relief.

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  • Can Aspirin treat breast cancer? Why aren’t we trying to find out?

    A researcher has found that women who reported taking Aspirin were 50 per cent less likely to die from their cancer than the women who did not take Aspirin or its generic form, ASA.

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  • Low reoccurrence in nipple-sparing mastectomy for BRCA1/2 cancers

    Study finds that both prophylactic and therapeutic nipple-sparing mastectomies were associated with low locoregional occurrence or recurrence. Occurrence or recurrence of cancer was not found within the preserved nipple-areolar complex.

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  • Breast cancer drug has a surprising new application, study finds

    An early study shows that gel-based tamoxifen may be as effective as the oral drug, and have fewer side effects.

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  • Breast Cancer in South Asians – Let’s Talk About It

    In a community where talking about breast cancer is taboo, there’s a need to reduce some of the stigma that exists.

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  • Blood test to indicate breast cancer risk ‘in development’

    Researchers are developing a simple blood test to help predict the likelihood of a woman developing breast cancer.

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  • 3D mammograms may increase early detection of breast cancer: study

    A new study of cancer patients suggests 3D mammograms may help doctors detect cancer more easily than traditional digital mammograms.

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  • New study highlights effectiveness of Ontario’s High Risk Breast Cancer Screening Program

    Cancer Care Ontario is leading the way in care for women who are at high risk for developing breast cancer, as shown in a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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  • Red meat possibly linked to breast cancer

    Women who often indulge their cravings for hamburgers, steaks and other red meat may have a slightly higher risk of breast cancer, a new study suggests.

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  • Exemestane plus ovarian function suppression may be a more effective alternative for premenopausal women with early-stage breast cancer

    In an analysis of two ongoing studies, researchers found that exemestane (Aromasin) was more effective at preventing hormone-sensitive breast cancer from returning for premenopausal women than tamoxifen when each drug was paired with ovarian function suppression.

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